Surface II- The Crypt- St Pancras

The Crypt Gallery, Euston Road, St. Pancras Church, London, NW12BA

Surface II is open from 13th July- 22nd July 2012 and is curated by Fiona Chaney and Louise Harrington

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Louise Harrington, Fiona Chaney, Sophie Cordery, Regina Valkenborgh, Lyndsey Searle, David Donald, Hazel Walsh, Stephen Buckeridge, Juliet Guiness, Sarah King, Sinéid Codd, Susan Eyre, Kelvin Burr, Amy-Louise Watson, Jessie Rayat, Nina Ciuffini, Hélène Uffren,
Jo Lovelock, Sarah Rose Allen, Debbie Lyddon, Susan Francis, Samantha Blanchard, 
Maria Gaitanidi, Cynthia Ayral, Natasa Stamatari, Alexandros Alexandridis 

I went to the opening of Surface II at St Pancras Church today. There is a gallery space underneath the church which has regular curated exhibitions. The show I visited today was a collection of 26 artists exploring the theme of surface.  The gallery itself is an  intriguing surface, with bare walls, arches, passageways and cavernous spaces and some artists had integrated their work directly with the interior.  For instance, artists had used the  walls to project  films upon, which produced an interesting result, as the walls were made up of  exposed crumbling brick work. The footage appeared fragmented and decayed. There was a lot of interesting ideas about surfaces, using painting, photography, performance and installation.

The artwork below is by Susan Eyre. It was impossible not to touch the surface of her work, as the texture was so inviting.

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Susan Eyre

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Susan Eyre- detail

Another artwork that I enjoyed was by Regina Valkenborgh, made with a beer can pin hole camera.

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Regina Valkenborgh

Louise Harrington

Louise Harrington

 Louise Harrington had created this sculptural photograph placed in one of the caverns at The Crypt.

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Fiona Chaney

Artwork by Kelvin Burr; chalky, faded, sanded down surfaces, with pools of colour being revealed in cavities and  diffused and soft mark making over the smooth top layers.

Hazel Walsh

Hazel Walsh displayed a series of images, which looked almost like drawings. They were really beautiful and unusual.

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