BOW ARTS OPEN STUDIO SEP 2013

clare mitten

CLARE MITTEN

Mitten_Counter_0-1I made a visit to the Bow Arts studios in Bermondsey on Friday night in particular to see Clare Mitten’s work. I have added images of her art that were not at Bow Arts. Clare Mitten makes mechanical/electronic structures out of cardboard, paper and other exciting materials.  Almost like a personalised 3-D printer, but made by hand and more colourful, Clare begins with reference to an actual device, yet allows the material choices to inform some of the decision making.

AZTECH, Installation View, 'A Curious Context', The Lobby, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, 2010

AZTECH, Installation View, ‘A Curious Context’, The Lobby, One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, 2010

I also liked the work on display in the following studios.
christina wrege

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ImageImage

Quote from Christina Wredge

This ongoing series of work aims to analyse the workings of forms in relation to a plane. The forms, rocks chosen at random, are in a communicative relation to one another. Planes of colour evoke the sense of a particular space. The forms are dropped into this setting and begin to inhabit it. They have been “mis-en-scene”.

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eun park

EUN PARK

EUN PARK

 

IMG_0436

Henry Mulhall

Henry Mullhall

Henry Mullhall and Jean Philippe Dordolo share a space at Bow Arts.

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Jean Philippe Dordolo

DISCUSSION WTIH JEAN-PHILIPPE DORDOLO

I was really struck by the work in Jean-Philippe’s work.

Jean-Philippe Dordolo’s website.

http://www.jeanphilippedordolo.com/

I was really interested to find out more about Jean Philippe Dordolo and he kindly answered some of my questions.

Your art works are often made of 2-D and 3-D  groupings. What is your starting point: a photo, or the 3-D material? How do you select additional elements to co-exist together?

My work never used to be like that. But the grouping of 2D and 3D slowly crept up in my work as I started to focus on different forms of narratives. I couldn’t tell you what comes first though as I do not follow any strict rule.

Im Horizont (Fischadler), 2012_ Wood, A1 b/w Xerox / H.290 W.129 D.49

Im Horizont (Fischadler), 2012_
Wood, A1 b/w Xerox / H.290 W.129 D.49

I like to make objects, experiment with techniques and material. I try to diversify my techniques in the studio, learn some new ones and distort them for another use. I want to materially challenge myself, and sometimes it also leads to materially challenge a subject matter.

Topographie einer ordentlichen Sitzung, 2012_ Selbstbefriedigung, 2012_ Alter und Schwerkraft, 2012_ MDF, Wood dowels, Painted wood, A1 Xerox print, Clay, Varnish / H.100 W.65 D.124

Topographie einer ordentlichen Sitzung, 2012_
Selbstbefriedigung, 2012_
Alter und Schwerkraft, 2012_
MDF, Wood dowels, Painted wood, A1 Xerox print, Clay, Varnish / H.100 W.65 D.124

A 2D image, particularly if selected from an existing visual archive (the internet is one of them, the pictures I take is another) all bear a certain form of symbolism. They are not the physical thing itself, but a representation of that thing. As such they have an underlying narrative to explore. The 2D image provide me with a context in which the 3D objects can fully assume their identity and express their relevance.

 Are you looking for opposites, for one surface quality to accentuate another or is the narrative/dialogue more important, where one object will react with another to create meaning or reinforce meaning?

I guess I could say I’m looking for both, yet not always simultaneously. Again it does really depends on how things present themselves in the studio. I think my approach is as processed based as it can be conceptual. I need to keep makings object and experimenting with material as much as I need to think about where things are heading, how they do relate to the world around me, and what it means to the viewers.

Topographie einer ordentlichen Sitzung, 2012_ Plaster board, Crystacal, Chipboard, Acrylic, b/w print / H.84 W.54 D.35

Topographie einer ordentlichen Sitzung, 2012_
Plaster board, Crystacal, Chipboard, Acrylic, b/w print / H.84 W.54 D.35

Maybe what makes a successful piece of work in my case relies on how balanced the form/dialogue ratio operates. The works I find less successful are those in which the 2D image simply illustrates the 3D object (or vice versa) without there being any integration process which would result in a distinct homogenous piece of work.

I look back at Topographie einer ordentlichen Sitzung thinking it was helpful in figuring out where I was going with the 2D/3D combination but in hindsight I’m not quite happy with the work itself. It was a great exercise for me, but not a great piece of work as it relies on the material illustration of an image only. It does not create new meanings or narratives.

Hundefutter, 2012_ Chipboard, MDF, Filler, Plaster, Concrete, Gold Leaves / H.136 W.34 D.37

Hundefutter, 2012_
Chipboard, MDF, Filler, Plaster, Concrete, Gold Leaves / H.136 W.34 D.37

I think if I can materially reconcile aesthetics (what I think you might mean when talking about one surface quality?) with a narrative/dialogue, then things will be heading in the right direction. I can’t consider content alone, in the same way I cannot work only towards a certain form of aesthetics…. It’s a joined effort

Is it the reinterpretation of a 2-D image to a 3-D form? Is it about simplifying visual images?

It can be a reinterpretation but as I move forward in my practice, it becomes more and more about integrating the 2D to the 3D in order to create an alternative form of narrative altogether.

The simplification of visual images generally relies on the concept of abstraction. From the moment I use an image, a symbol, and edit it, there clearly is a bit of that going on. I’m trying to learn how and when to stop simplifying it, because I do not believe in abstraction as a pure stylistic form standing its ground. There is something too polite about that for me.

Handwaffe, 2013_ Plaster, Wood, Filler / W.30 D.8

Handwaffe, 2013_
Plaster, Wood, Filler / W.30 D.8

But going back to the topics I choose, this is lead by research and processes of association. When I started to work with marquetry, I could not consider the craft without its history and the way it was applied to furniture and decorative arts. I then started to work and research images alluding to that sort of era. I could not shake out Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon out of my head somehow.

Ein Sommer in Long Island, 2013_ B/W Print, Lollies / H.107 W.161 - Plaster, Lollies / H.122 W.88 D.7

Ein Sommer in Long Island, 2013_
B/W Print, Lollies / H.107 W.161 – Plaster, Lollies / H.122 W.88 D.7

The plaster and lollies work you found in my studio really reminded me of an explosion. I wanted to use it in that way rather than just as another abstract object. The idea of creating a narrative that was displaced, almost alien to the nature of the object itself, really appealed to me. Hence the use of that print from the Battle of Long Island.

I guess most of my recent work plays around the notion of historicism. The great thing about this is that it grants me a field of research with no limits. I guess I’m interested in mixing signals, proving there not one universal truth. In the same way my work relies on the careful intervention of many factors (in terms of aesthetics and narratives) whose combination decides of a particular outcome. Yet this outcome could be completely different if the context or use of parameters was different.

Bzzzz, 2013_ Wood, MDF, Acrylic, Polyurethane, Filler / H.79 W.33.5 D.33.5

Bzzzz, 2013_
Wood, MDF, Acrylic, Polyurethane, Filler / H.79 W.33.5 D.33.5

Fallenlassen der Akzent, 2013_ MDF / H.84.5 W. 59.5

Fallenlassen der Akzent, 2013_
MDF / H.84.5 W. 59.5

How important are the plinths in your work. They are not the usual white cube, but take on sculptural qualities of their own, often unprimed and rough. Is this to expose the textures of the materials, to elevate the status of MDF/ chipboard etc? Do you want some elements to show craftsmanship and others to be rough and ready?

I believe it takes some craftsmanship to get away with the rough and ready aesthetics of a work. I can see the difference between those who can and those who can’t. Look at Manfred Pernice for instance. He knows! I think it’s part of the experience of learning a technique until the medium is under control. Only then can one take some liberties and try to get away from the usual format of presentation of that medium, use the medium differently. Now I would not call myself a craftsman. I think my knowledge is too superficial for that present. But it’s definitely something I want to push so that I can break free from the tradition of a material or medium, develop a singular language.

Landscape Drawings (Sunset / Sunrise), 2011_ Untitled Gurgling, 2011_ MDF, Chipboard, Acrylic, Styrene, Filler, Gurgling Jug, Modified Coconut

Landscape Drawings (Sunset / Sunrise), 2011_
Untitled Gurgling, 2011_
MDF, Chipboard, Acrylic, Styrene, Filler, Gurgling Jug, Modified Coconut

Selbstbefriedigung, 2012_ MDF, Wood dowel, Paint, A2 Xerox Print / H.173 W.62 D.68

Selbstbefriedigung, 2012_
MDF, Wood dowel, Paint, A2 Xerox Print / H.173 W.62 D.68

Going back to the plinth finish for instance, the plinth’s function is to elevate. It’s forcing the singularity and sacred character of a particular item onto an audience. I’m not sure the plinth should always be painted because their purpose lays somewhere else. After all they have traditionally been made of carved stone. They sometimes have ornaments but most of the time a paint job would be turning the plinth into a neutral display tool for museum context. If I have to make a plinth, I prefer to register its history and monumentality: its readiness to elevate. I want it to become part of the work and to be potent, raw.

 I really liked the plaster and lollipop sticks. Some of your work seems quite fast and quickly executed. It seems like you enjoy this quality to your work, it is humorous, non-monumental and instantly appealing. It reminded me a little of Franz West or Frank Bowlings drip paintings.

Thank you for the feedback. I guess there is worst than being compared to Franz West!

(Well just the lumpy plaster piece) Frank Bowling came to mind when I saw this.

Swiss Break, 2011_ Painted Steel, Acrylic, PingPong Ball

Swiss Break, 2011_
Painted Steel, Acrylic, PingPong Ball

And this, purely with the sense of things that should slide are halted or suspended.

Lebenszyklus eines Huhns, 2011_ Pan Steel Handle, Styrene, Hay, Raw Egg Yolk (changed daily)

Lebenszyklus eines Huhns, 2011_
Pan Steel Handle, Styrene, Hay, Raw Egg Yolk (changed daily)

Yes I tend to execute things rather ‘quickly’ once I set my mind to it. To be honest it does take me a lot of standing around looking at what I have done / am doing before I manage to take the work further. It’s part of trying to find that balance I referred to earlier. Knowing how to go about it, creating the narrative. Then when I get an idea, even though I’m never sure if will deliver, I set off to be as efficient about it as possible. I always remember that principle from ‘hagakure: the way of the samurai’ whereby a warrior should always set of to act on a decision within seven breaths after taking it. Ultimately an artist is a doer. And risk taking is mainly going with an intuition and acting on it wholeheartedly. If this can be seen in the work, I guess everything is not lost!

Jean- Philippe Dordolo

I very much worked like that with the lollies and plaster piece. It was quite instant. But a lot of the work was also to think about how to turn it into something more than this object, this material gesture that’s just pretty. I like to make my work quite quirky and appealing. But it’s even more important to create a context for it. If not the work only becomes a one liner.

The more literal-minded opted for works that made direct reference to an egg: Jean-Philippe Dordolo’s Landscape Drawings (Sunset / Sunrise) (2011), in which two raw egg yolks quiver in the bottom-right and top-left corners of two framed boxes, was prominently displayed in the reception area beneath the orange glow of Dexter Sinister’s Neon for the Serving Library (2011).

Landscape Drawings (Sunset / Sunrise) (2011)

From Frieze Issue 147 May 2012 “

The Curator’s Egg” by Eleanor Nairne

The more literal-minded opted for works that made direct reference to an egg: Jean-Philippe Dordolo’s Landscape Drawings (Sunset / Sunrise) (2011), in which two raw egg yolks quiver in the bottom-right and top-left corners of two framed boxes, was prominently displayed in the reception area beneath the orange glow of Dexter Sinister’s Neon for the Serving Library (2011).

Artworks that  you create,  such as the eggs to  look like sunsets/sunrise has a ‘certain’ amount of temporality which defies permanence and monumental work?

Indeed. I’m not sure I realised all that until after I made the work. For a show which lasted a month, someone had to come everyday in the morning to lay an egg in each frame, and in the evening to clear off so that it doesn’t mark the surface to badly. Monumental task for a work which seems so simple. I was so impressed the gallery went for it and embraced the process.I’m not one to feel like I want my work to go to posterity. If it does, cool. But if it doesn’t that’s fine as well. Eternity is here only to satisfy the ego. The making is more important than the shelf live

Thank you Jean- Philippe for your in depth answers to my questions…

TO VIEW work at Bow Arts

FOR YOURSELF ……..

Open Studios Programme

Mise-en-scène

Mise-en-scène e-invite
Friday, September 20, 2013 to Saturday, October 5, 2013

Please join us for the preview of the show from 6-9pm Friday 20th September.

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