KATE MCGARRY GALLERY- JOSH BLACKWELL Never Uses

JOSH BLACKWELL- IMAGES FROM KATE MCGARRY WEBSITE

JOSH BLACKWELL-
IMAGES FROM KATE MCGARRY WEBSITE

JOSH BLACKWELL

JOSH BLACKWELL

My ‘housewife’ friend took me to see one of her favourite galleries the other day. She went along to the talk Josh Blackwell was giving too. He changes plastic bags into beautiful objects, which she says reminded her of bear’s faces. There were simply quite beautiful.

17 January – 1 March 2014

This is Kate Mcgarry’s press release for the show.

Kate MacGarry is pleased to announce Never Uses, Josh Blackwell’s fourth solo exhibition at the gallery. Blackwell has created an installation from his seriesPlastic Baskets: found plastic bags embroidered with wool, silk and paper. The bags’ brightly coloured forms will cascade across the main wall of the gallery and onto a casual mural painted in situ. The bags are suggestive of tribal masks, body parts, amateur maps and broken computers.

Blackwell began this series of works during a residency at the Delfina Foundation in London in 2005. Exploring the overlaps between convenience, redundancy, and excess, Blackwell transforms the ultimate disposable object, the plastic bag, into something precious, elegantly crafted and obsessively detailed. The bags are collected by the artist as he finds them in New York City, and are accepted in their degraded form. They undergo various processes of alteration, from simple to elaborate, small to large and low key to highly coloured, in the artist’s quest to make something very ordinary into something extraordinary.

Josh Blackwell, born 1972 in New Orleans, lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He studied at Bennington College and CalArts. Recent exhibitions include: Our Haus, Salon 94, New York, 2013; A Conspiracy of Detail, Mackintosh Museum, Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland, 2013; Glaze, Galerie Chez Valentin, Paris, 2012;Josh Blackwell and Roger White, Riverside Art Museum, Riverside, CA, 2011; A New Hook: Rethinking Needlework, Museum Bellerive, Zurich, Switzerland, 2011; Winter in America, Tanja Pol Galerie, Munich, Germany, 2011 and Material Issues and Other Matters, CANADA, New York, NY, 2010.

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JOSH BLACKWELL Never Uses

17 January – 1 March 2014

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RICHARD DEACON AT TATE BRITAIN

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RICHARD DEACON

RICHARD DEACON

Tate Britain: Exhibition
5 February – 27 April 2014

deacon16 Richard Deacon, Another Ribbon Bow (2004) ID_0711-1024x795 images-1

I spent about 4 hours doing a drawing of ‘art for other people’ on one day as you could not take photos in the exhibition. It was also quite enjoyable spending time in one room and listening to all the people talking about the work and chatting to small children who were also sketching Deacon’s art and had some imaginative ideas about what you could use them for. One girl thought the piece on the left could be a handbag and the tall cylinder was a magic potion bottle from a story she had read. There was a surprising amount of artists drawing his sculptures.

DRAWING AT THE TATE

DRAWING AT THE TATE

self and other selves

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I have gathered a few images which I am going to show my students for their project of self. They were not best pleased about the topic before half term as they thought they must only do portraits. However, there are so many other things they could do. Here is a collection of images that I found one morning and thought, well why not make a post too. There are so many more I could and probably should add.

I start with Mia Wilkes, who I saw at the Truman Brewery last year. A photograph of catergorising material possessions.SELF Michael Borreman’s work reminds me of living porcelain. Slide02
Slide03 Slide04 Slide05 Slide06 Slide07 Slide08 The owl by Durer I just liked.Slide09 Slide10 Slide11 Slide12 Slide13 Slide14 Slide15Arthur Dove’s landscapes to me are like someone’s emotions depicted through nature.
Slide16 Slide17 Slide18 Slide19 Slide20 Capturing everyday scenes such as the weather.Slide21 Political and cultural identitySlide22 Slide23 memories and matter transformed into something newSlide24 Slide25 Slide26 Slide27 Slide28 Slide29 Slide30 Slide31 Slide32 Slide33 Slide34 Slide35 Slide36 Slide37 Slide38 Slide39 Slide40 Slide41 Slide42 Slide43 Slide44 Slide45 Slide46 obliterationSlide47 Slide48 Slide49 Slide50 Slide51 expressionSlide52 Slide53Slide54 Slide55 Slide56 dreaming and sleepingSlide57 dreamsSlide58 Slide59 Slide60 Slide61 Slide62 Slide63 Slide64

Abstract Drawing – DRAWING ROOM- BERMONDSEY

Drawing Room
Tannery Arts,
12 Rich Estate,
Crimscott Street,
London SE1 5TE

gordon matta clark

gordon matta clark

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The exhibition runs from 20 February 2014 – 19 April 2014

I went to see it yesterday and spent quite a bit of time in the library as well, looking at the artists reading lists with titles such as:

‘Dialogue in the void, Beckett and Giacometti’ by Matti Megged

Joseph Albers: ‘Interation of colour’

‘A short history of decay’ by Em Cioran 

‘The moire effect’ Lytle Shaw.

The work was curated by the sculptor Richard Deacon. A lot of the pieces reminded me of his aesthetic, with geometric forms, wavy lines patterns and curls. I had a few favourites, such as Gordon Matta Clark’s cut through a pad of paper.

Magic Hour Drawings, 2013

BLOCK 336

Brixton and the curious Coutts Bank connection

My artist friend Hannah Williamson, asked me to visit the Block 336 space again. With it being the first day of half term, this made a very good start to the holidays. The show runs from 8. Feb – 7. Mar 14  and is definitely worthy of a visit. We were greeted by one of the artists Robert Bell who showed us around.

Block 336 is a gallery and  artist space just a short walk from Brixton Tube. The current show features artists that actually work and help manage the space.

P1090261336 Brixton Rd
Opening hours: Thurs – Sat, 12 – 6 pm (or by appointment)
Studio visits by appointment
Brixton tube station: 7 mins walk

The artists in the exhibition seemed to share an interest in organic and abstracted sculptural forms which were all represented 2-dimensionally, beginning with Tom Groves,  with his series of observational paintings. Although the subject matter was ambiguous, I enjoyed the balance between something living with their fleshy pink colours and the regimented  and plastic-like glossy surfaces. They looked liked a hybrid between packaging, sculpted plasticine and lost mass-produced fragments from children’s toys.

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TOM GROVES
something there- oil on canvas

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TOM GROVES
an unsuitable substitute- oil on canvas

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TOM GROVES painting in background- the not not- oil on canvas

Next we spent some time examining the intricate and beautiful work by Jane Hayes Greenwood. Again, we ‘recognized’ the origins of these drawings,  being familiar somehow, but in fact not of anything we could place and therefore quite alien. The drawings were made up of what looked like graphite and pencil and incorporated a mixture of flowing marks; recording indents, and malleable  surface textures against crisp edges. One piece,  Jane Hayes Greenwood had torn the paper to give a sense of decay and age.  This dichotomy of perfection and destruction created an interesting tension to her work. The objects were captured on a shiny table top, blocked off from any context of their use, so they appeared like archaeological objects from a museum. The work had a primitive and child like quality,  but with ritualistic and perhaps sinister undertones.

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JANE HAYES GREENWOOD-‘ the returned’ – 14 framed graphite drawings

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close up Jane Hayes Greenwood-‘back up’

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JANE HAYES GREENWOOD – ‘profane fingers’

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JANE HAYES GREENWOOD

Alex Virji’s paintings on raw linen were  reminiscent of landscapes, of trees and plants, combined with solid geometric forms. I discovered how Virji initially writes down a title to begin a body of work, to help create a focus. The paintings sat quietly in the exhibition and embodied a sense of purity and freshness with their thin glazes of paint and clean blocks of colour in acrylic and gouache.

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quarry (after durer)
acrylic and gouache on linen

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installation shot of DEERBORN- ALEX VIRJI

Alex Gough’s paintings were iridescent and shimmering smoke like forms, filling the entire canvas. The paint disappeared into the weave of the canvas, so it  appeared misty and faded. The paint was captured in a state of flux, colours marbling into one another to create complex and organic forms. The work seemed to be an enjoyment upon the physicality and beauty of paint.

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wilderness in paint 20

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installation shot from Block 336
wilderness in paint 20 – left hand side
pigment, acrylic binder, gouache, gesso, polyester and canvas

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erämaa
which means wilderness in Finland

Finally Robert Bell’s work. His paintings are made up of many layers of scrubbed spray paint, so sanding, smoothing, coating stripes of colour onto wood to reveal all and none of the paintings history simultaneously. The work had so many beautiful qualities, I took several close ups.

ROBERT BELL

ROBERT BELL close up of surface

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close up of painting- reminded me of a shop selling the universe.

The title of this painting is called ‘we came out of the light, into the darkness we go.’

The work was abstract, yet conjured up so many other possibilities, such as circuitry, landscapes and figures. Below is the entire painting.

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ROBERT BELL

Robert Bell had also created digital animations, using photographs of his paintings and mapping these over textured 3-D objects. The concept closely mirrored that of his paintings, being a display of the quantities and qualities of paint, with the painting surface becoming manipulated and exposed all the way through, like a dissection. The shapes became  flowers, organs, sea creatures all at once. They were mesmerizing to watch as they gently spun around.

Robert  Bell also showed us his line drawings and many photos which documented the systematic planning for his paintings. I found this surprising as his paintings looked so much about chance, but in fact he had carefully mapped out the shape and position of different colours before he began the work. He said that his paintings took him about 5 months to create and consisted of hundreds of layers of varying colours of spray paint.

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ROBERT BELL

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sword/swords

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close up of Robert Bell’s painting

 Click on LINK BELOW to view his animations. A series of short edited clips.

ROBERT BELL